How Do You Brew?

Coffee. It used to be a convenient dose of caffeine for the masses who didn’t put much thought into the industry or what they were drinking. Coffee pod names like Keurig, Nespresso, and Tassimo come to mind when we think about these convenience junkies who just wanted to get through their day. Fast forward to now: an age where specialty coffee has come back swinging, advocating that quality should not be compromised for convenience. With many high-end coffee shops on the rise, it’s no longer a “what kind of coffee do you drink?” question, but rather, a “how do you brew your coffee?” conversation that seems to be rising.

As specialty coffee increases in popularity, various types of home brewing process seem to be popping up in households. Many people— not just coffee snobs, are beginning to see the benefit of enjoying a great cup of coffee to start their day. Here at SOLID Coffee Roasters, we not only roast and provide specialty coffee to others ( with scores above 89 to boast ), but we take pride in the brewing process as well. Here are some devices that were tested in home kitchens that you may have heard of: 

Hario v60 size 2 dripper  This is the process we at SOLID use to pour ourselves our cuppa every morning and also serve at events. This process pours a uniform brew into a single cup, which balances sweetness and acidity.  The con with this method is the breakable ceramic make up of it, and the large hole in the middle, which can easily let water pass. To successfully make a great cup with this process requires the right type of grind and pouring technique to achieve best results.  Best used for East African coffees.


Hario v60 size 2 dripper 

This is the process we at SOLID use to pour ourselves our cuppa every morning and also serve at events. This process pours a uniform brew into a single cup, which balances sweetness and acidity. 

The con with this method is the breakable ceramic make up of it, and the large hole in the middle, which can easily let water pass. To successfully make a great cup with this process requires the right type of grind and pouring technique to achieve best results.  Best used for East African coffees.

Bodum Chambord (French press) This brewing method requires no pouring skills and allows full control of steeping time. It can brew 8 cups at a time with no filters, producing a rich cup of coffee. Since the filtration system isn’t as keen as other methods, ground and coffee sludge can seep into cup. Also, messy clean up is often a source of complaint with this method.


Bodum Chambord (French press)

This brewing method requires no pouring skills and allows full control of steeping time. It can brew 8 cups at a time with no filters, producing a rich cup of coffee.

Since the filtration system isn’t as keen as other methods, ground and coffee sludge can seep into cup. Also, messy clean up is often a source of complaint with this method.

Aeropress The Aeropress is small and portable with easy clean up. Mostly used in camping situations where convenience is key, and can produce coffee and espresso. Cup profile is balanced and pleasant. The cons include that it makes a small cup of coffee and requires specific filters. 


Aeropress

The Aeropress is small and portable with easy clean up. Mostly used in camping situations where convenience is key, and can produce coffee and espresso. Cup profile is balanced and pleasant.

The cons include that it makes a small cup of coffee and requires specific filters. 

   Bee House ceramic dripper   The Bee house has 2 Drain holes, which provides easier water control than a Hario V60 and brews into a single cup.  The cons include the size, which is smaller than a V60, therefore only brewing 1 cup at a time, and it also requires specific filters. 

  

Bee House ceramic dripper 

 The Bee house has 2 Drain holes, which provides easier water control than a Hario V60 and brews into a single cup. 

The cons include the size, which is smaller than a V60, therefore only brewing 1 cup at a time, and it also requires specific filters. 

Chemex - Eight Cup Maker The beautiful hourglass design of the Chemex uses a bond filter heavier than most, which filters out oils and sediment to make a smooth, bitter free coffee. It can also produce 8 cups at a time for more coffee enjoyment.  Cons include the Chemex Brand filter that is needed to use it and  a specific long handled brush to clean up properly. In addition, the Chemex often does not produce the complexities in the coffee found in the other brewing devices. 


Chemex - Eight Cup Maker

The beautiful hourglass design of the Chemex uses a bond filter heavier than most, which filters out oils and sediment to make a smooth, bitter free coffee. It can also produce 8 cups at a time for more coffee enjoyment. 

Cons include the Chemex Brand filter that is needed to use it and  a specific long handled brush to clean up properly. In addition, the Chemex often does not produce the complexities in the coffee found in the other brewing devices. 

Siphon This brewing process is a great conversation process, which requires no pouring skills. There is better control of steeping time and water temperature, producing an ideal cup with no sludge or ground seepage of a French Press The storage of this piece can be a setback, as well as the clean up. There is also a certain level of skill that must be practiced to create an ideal cup, and there is also a small butange burner that needs to be purchased.  With all these unique brewing methods becoming increasingly popular in homes and specialty coffee shops alike, it seems like quality is winning over  convenience. An extra minute or two of more customized work to getting that perfect cup to start your day seems to be worth it to many people. We here at SOLID agree the day can bring many unexpected things, but good coffee should be something you have a full say in, and from the looks of it, others seem to agree. Thanks to organizations like the Specialty Coffee Association of America that was made to uphold the quality of coffee to the masses, it does not look like specialty coffee will be waving the white flag any time soon


Siphon

This brewing process is a great conversation process, which requires no pouring skills. There is better control of steeping time and water temperature, producing an ideal cup with no sludge or ground seepage of a French Press

The storage of this piece can be a setback, as well as the clean up. There is also a certain level of skill that must be practiced to create an ideal cup, and there is also a small butange burner that needs to be purchased. 

With all these unique brewing methods becoming increasingly popular in homes and specialty coffee shops alike, it seems like quality is winning over  convenience. An extra minute or two of more customized work to getting that perfect cup to start your day seems to be worth it to many people. We here at SOLID agree the day can bring many unexpected things, but good coffee should be something you have a full say in, and from the looks of it, others seem to agree. Thanks to organizations like the Specialty Coffee Association of America that was made to uphold the quality of coffee to the masses, it does not look like specialty coffee will be waving the white flag any time soon